Welcome to Norbury Watch

I  created this blog as a way of bringing together details of news and issues about the  Norbury area of the London Borough of Croydon, given the growing number of community and other types of organisations active in the area and the events they run, and the wide range of issues of concern to residents. See more in the About section.

Sean Creighton: sean.creighton1947@btinternet.com

I am a member of the Norbury Village Residents Association and  Love Norbury Committees and Chair of the Norbury Community Land Trust. I was a member of the Council’s Norbury Regeneration Steering Group with the local Councillors and representatives of the Residents Associations and other local groupswhich stopped meeting because of the pandemic. I research and publish on aspects of Norbury’s history and set up with David Clark the informal Norbury History Group. I also run a blog site on Croydon events, issues and news:

https://seancreighton1947.wordpress.com

Residents Associations

There are four Residents Associations:

whose areas are on both sides of London Rd,

Love Norbury Partnership

The four London Rd area Residents Associations set up the Love Norbury Partnership to work together on common issues and to organise joint events like London Rd Clean Up days, a summer festival, the ‘Xmas’ lights on the lamp posts, and the Xmas Fayres.

Since May 2019 the Partnership has been opened up to other local groups, currently the Friends of Norbury  and Norbury Hall Parks, the Bowling Club in Turle Rd, the Cassandra Centre above Lloyd’s Bank, and the Norbury Community Land Trust.

Knitting Norbury Together

This group is linked in with Love Norbury. It decorates the streets and events. For more details contact ann.creighton@btinternet.com

Friends of the Parks

With the help of the Residents Associations the following Friends of the Parks groups have been set up:

Friends of Norbury Park: fnorpark@outlook.com

Friends of Norbury Hall Park: http://norburyhallpark.org.uk

Other groups and activities

Litter Free Norbury (established December 2020)

www.litterfreenorbury.org/blog

Local faith groups

Allotments Society

Manor Farm Reserve group

Norbury Community Land Trust

Welcome to the Norbury Community Land Trust

Norbury Bowls Club

Norbury Park Lawn Tennis Club: https://clubspark.lta.org.uk/NorburyParkLTC

Cassandra Learning Centre

Darby & Joan Club

There are also small groups and initiatives by individuals such the residents of 1-6 Semley Close, and the residents in Radnor House,  gardening groups, the reading group at the Library, and Street Champions.

Norbury and the Council 

Norbury is divided into two electoral wards along the railway line with two Councillors each.Since May 2022 they are:

Norbury & Pollards Hill:

matt.griffiths@croydon.gov.uk

Norbury Park:

Appu.Srinivasan@croydon.gov.uk

Norbury Regeneration Steering Group

In March 2019 the Council set up the Norbury Regeneration Steering Group comprising the four Councillors, the five residents associations, the two Friends of the Parks groups,  Community Land Trust and Cassandra Learning Centre. Other local groups wishing to may also become members or ask to speak to the Committee. It has not met during the COVID pandemic. It has not yet been restarted.

Norbury’s MP

Norbury is in Croydon North Parliamentary constituency. The MP is Steve Reed re-elected in the General Election in December 2019.

https://www.stevereedmp.co.uk

COVID Pandemic

Since March 2020 organised activities by the local organisations  had to be suspended, such as public meetings, the summer and Christmas Fayres and member and  public meetings. The Library was unable to re-open in January after refurbishment. The Councillors could not hold their advice surgeries. The only group that has been able to be active on the streets has been Knitting Norbury Together. Cassandra  Centre was involved in providing hot meals to elderly and vulnerable residents. It was able to provide Christmas hampers with funding support from Love  Norbury and the Residents Associations. The groups  kept their eye  on local issues, including through Zoom Committee meetings, and making representations especially on planning.

December 2021 Update

With the easing of COVID lockdown local organisations in September the local organisations began to plan their activities.  The celebratory opening of the Library planned for July  and then September had to be cancelled. The Library is open for book borrowing etc. Love Norbury ran its Xmas Fayre on 27 November 2021. Cassandra Centre re-started its Thursday lunch and activities club and its family and children’s activities, including a December trip to the pantomine. Litter Free Norbury members  continued their picking up litter, reporting fly-tips and removed graffiti. Using Councillors ward budget money Love Norbury has a three year contract for the  Xmas lights from the Station up towards Pollards Hill.

Updated June 2022

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St Philip’s BBQ 14 August

We are now taking payment at the gate but will need people
to still let us know they are coming for catering purposes.

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Norbury Update 9 August

50 Bishops Park Rd Development — Norbury Park SNP Appeal For Help — Friends of Norbury Park Concerns — Planning Applications, Approvals and Refusals — Magic Mondays

Block Of Flats Development Proposal Angers Bishops Park Rd Neighbours

An application proposes to demolish 50 Bishops Park Road and build a new property on the frontage with access to a block of flats at the back. Neighbours are concerned  expressed during the Zoom meeting ranged over the negative impact on the quality of life by having up to 35 more people living in a cramped development, parking and traffic problems, potential overlooking, the design not being in character with the street, loss of trees, subsidence potential, increase in noise from the railway, reduction in privacy, loss of light, and lack of being consulted by the applicant before submitting the plans. Local Councillors Leila Ben-Hassel and Matt Griffiths held a Zoom meeting with residents on Friday. They intend to object which means that if the Planners want to approve the application it will have to go to the Planning Committee/Sub-committee. I am analysing the documents submitted so far on which Norbrury with a view to recommending the grounds on which Norbury Village Residents Association can object.

One of the neighbours has sent been me the text of her objection.

‘- Detrimental impact on tree(s)
– Not in Keeping with the area
– Obtrusive by design
– Over Development
– Traffic or Highways

Bishops Park Road is a tree-lined road which is a mix of Edwardian and 1930’s housing stock. The proposed development of a modern three story block of flats is completely out of keeping with the style of housing in the street and would have an over bearing and oppressive impact on the surrounding houses and on the area.

It is also a busy road with no off street parking, and parking is limited and restricted by parking meters

It is also of concern that a number of mature trees would be lost as a consequence of this inappropriate development’

A planning officer with another local authority who lives in another part of Norbury comments:

‘This is a clear case of over development which is completely out of character for the area. There are some units with their outlook towards neighbours which is not ideal. It creates an oppressive sense of development and loss of outlook for the neighbours. The extent of development/hard landscaping is also an issue. This is in addition to the issues with the design/character (or lack of it).’

Thursday 11 August. From 10am.Norbury Park Police Request Help With Leafletting

Officers from Norbury Park Safer Neighbourhood Team are planning a range of community engagement activities throughout this month which will be published on Nextdoor accordingly.

They are emailed a request for volunteers to help  local police officers drop leaflets containing information about crime prevention advice. ‘This will be a great chance to speak to your ward team and discuss any ongoing issue you are experiencing while living in the Norbury Park ward.  Any volunteer please reply this email with name and contact number if possible. SNMailbox.NorburyParkSNT@met.police.uk

FNP Raises Concerns With The Mayor

Friends of Norbury Park have written to Mayor Jason Perry  inform and update him  about several worrying situations affecting Norbury Park, namely the inappropriate use of
the Park by festival events and the overuse of access by heavy duty vehicles entering through the private Harefield Road from Green Lane.

Use of Harefield Road

‘Over the last few days lorries weighing well over 25 tons have been using Harefield Road to
access the park. This is a small privately owned un-made road, with at least three vulnerable residents. These lorries were using Harefield Road throughout the night. They have caused damage to the intersection of Harefield Road and Green Lane.

‘We are in the process of investigating the nature of the agreement between the residents and
the council for use of the road, but it is clear that it is entirely unsuitable for lorries of this size to use the road for access to the park, and for access to be available at unsociable hours.’

Location of Events

This year’s’ 7th August music festival site has ‘been located on top of the much-loved and expensive all weather cricket pitch. This is a valuable asset, particularly to the Asian community, who play most evenings, giving them the opportunity to destress from their demanding work lives.

We are unclear why the event has been located here, as we have an agreed plan with the
council that events will be held on the field closest to Norbury station, with access from the
A23 entrance.’


Rave Parties

‘A further worrying issue is the constant pop-up Rave Parties who bring music and BBQ
equipment into the park via Harefield Road and are set up adjacent to the boxing club. The
mess that they leave behind is horrendous.’

 
You have an enthusiastic group of volunteer litter pickers who support the Council by trying to keep the park clean, but we’re told that the Boxing Club are responsible for a 20 metre
perimeter around the pavilion. We would appreciate confirmation of this, as currently they are not fulfilling this obligation.’

An issue that has emerged is that despite its pledge to work with Friends groups, it does not inform them of applications to hold events and involve them in discussions with the organsiers at the start.

Food Festival in September

‘Finally, there is a planned Food Festival in the park in September. We would like your
assurance that the issues highlighted above will be resolved so that the event is held in the
correct location and that Harefield Road will not be used.’

The FNP email was copied to Cllr Scott Roche, the  Cabinet Member for Streets and Environment, who has replied that he discuss the issues with  officers to discuss the points, to see what can be done where possible. 

Planning

Planning Applications

36 Croft Road. First-floor side extension, single-storey rear extension with raised terrace and front porch extension. 

63 Darcy Road. Conversion of dwelling house  to two self-contained flats.

1B Pollards Hill East. Four roof lights on front roof slope and dormer projection on rear roof slope.

Planning Approvals

6 Craignish Avenue. Use of dwelling as HMO for 8 persons. Conditions inc:

‘Prior to the first occupation of the dwelling as a large HMO … full details of the following shall be submitted to and approved in writing by the Local Planning Authority: a) Refuse Management Plan including elevations and materials of store, waste and recycling management. The development shall be carried out strictly in accordance with the details thus approved. Reason: To ensure that the appearance of the development is acceptable and contributes towards a high quality built environment.’

‘The proposed cycle parking … shall be provided and completed prior to first occupation of the development as a large HMO and maintained for its permitted use for the lifetime of the development. Reason: To ensure that an appropriate quantum of cycle parking is provided to an acceptable standard.’

‘The house in multiple occupation …. shall be restricted to no more than 6 bedrooms and shall have no more than 8 individual tenants unless otherwise agreed in writing by the local planning authority. The living room and warden room shall not be used as bedrooms; The designated first floor bedrooms shall have no more than 1 resident each and the ground floor bedrooms no more than 2 residents each whilst the approved use remains in existence. Prior to first occupation of the approved use, an HMO licence for the property for up to but not more than 8 people shall be obtained. Reason: To maintain control over the nature of the use and to protect neighbouring amenity in accordance with policies SP6 and DM10 of the Croydon Local Plan 2018. 6.’

‘The development must be carried out in accordance with the provisions of the Planning Fire Statement … unless otherwise approved in writing by the Local Planning Authority. Reason: To ensure that the development incorporates the necessary fire safety measures in accordance with the Policy D12 of the London Plan (2021).’

21 Georgia Road. Outbuilding for use as a granny annexe. Conditions inc.:

‘The outbuilding/granny annexe hereby approved shall only be used together with and ancillary to the use of the existing property as a single dwelling and shall not be used as an independent self-contained dwelling. Reason: Use of the accommodation as a separate dwelling would result in development out of character with the area and harm to the residential amenities of adjoining occupiers.’

‘All new external work and work of making good shall be carried out in materials as specified in the application Reason: To ensure that alterations are completed with regard to the character and appearance of the existing building and the visual amenity of the area.’

‘Prior to the occupation of the development at least one water butt of 100 litre volume shall be installed on a downpipe attached to the roof of the outbuilding and be retained and maintained for the lifetime of the development. Reason: To ensure that the principles of sustainable drainage are incorporated into the development and to reduce the impact of flooding.’

‘Unless otherwise specified in the application the development must be in accordance with the Fire Safety Statement. Reason: To ensure that the development is in accordance with the London Plan’

79A Northwood Road Conversion of loft to habitable space, rear dormer and two roof lights to the front roof slope. Conditions include:

‘The development must be carried out in accordance with the provisions of the Planning Fire Safety Strategy received on 16th February 2022 unless otherwise approved in writing by the Local Planning Authority. Reason: To ensure that the development incorporates the necessary fire safety measures in accordance with the Policy D12 of the London Plan (2021).’

94 Stanford Road – Outside Freeman Court. Advertising as part of a new bus shelter. VALO Smart City UK Ltd.

Planning Refusal. 11 Groveland Avenue 

GPDO single storey rear extension. Reason: ‘The development by reason of its depth, height and massing would cause significant harm on residential amenity of Nos. 9 and 13 Groveland Avenue and would thereby be contrary with the policies DM10.6 of the Croydon Local Plan 2018 and D3 of the London Plan 2021.’

Planning Refusal – 17 Kilmartin Avenue

Alterations, demolition of existing conservatory, erection of single-storey rear extension and rear dormer extension . Reason: ‘The development would be detrimental to the amenities of the occupiers of adjoining property by reason of its size and siting resulting in visual intrusion and overshadowing and would thereby conflict with Policy D6 of the London Plan 2021 and Policy DM10 of the Croydon Local Plan 2018.’

Planning Refusal – 23 Stanford Road

Demolition of existing rear extension and erection of new single storey rear extension.  Reason: ‘The proposal would be detrimental to the amenities of the adjoining occupiers by reason of its height, size and massing and resultant loss of outlook and dominant appearance; and would thereby conflict with Policy DM10 of the Croydon Local Plan (2018) and D3 and D4 of the London Plan (2021).

Planning Appeal Withdrawn

48 Crescent Way. Use of ground floor flat as two 1 bedroom flats (Existing Use). 

History Update

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Norbury Update 1 August

Cassandra Lunch Club Closed Till 8 September

Jennifer McDermott of the Cassandra Centre has with regret had to close the lunch club  for August. It will re-open on 8 September.

A trip to Southend is taking place on 11 August. It is hoped to organise other trips in August.

Lack Of Children’s Daily Activities In Norbury

Jennifer McDermott of the Cassandra Centre says that parents, especially those in employment, are struggling to find safe holiday projects for their children, especially in Norbury and the north of the Borough. Cassandra Centre hopes to  take a handful of the children known to it to Thorpe Park.  

Wednesday 21 September. 7.30pm. Love Norbury Annual General Meeting

Norbury Methodist Church, 2a Pollards Hill North The Executive Mayor and the local councillors have been invited.  Please put this date in your diary.  

1447 London Road Licence Change Application

The owner of the Woodland Café has posted a notice on her other premises at 1447 London Rd to change the hours and trading name.  The Licensing team tells me that the application is not yet at the stage to enter the 28 day consultation period. Therefore application document is not yet on the Council website.

Planning Applications

82 Kensington Avenue.  LDC & GPDO  single storey rear extension.

85 Norbury Hill. Single storey detached outbuilding for use as granny annexe associated with main house

Planning Approvals

138 Green Lane. Demolition of rear extension, extension to roof including erection of rear dormer extension, erection of part-single/two-storey side/rear extension rooflights.

90 Ingram Road. Conversion of garage to habitable space, part single storey, part double storey side extension and first floor rear extension.  

43 Norbury Close. LDC conversion of loft to habitable space plus front facing windows. 

7 Tisbury Road.  LDC  single storey rear extension.

Croydon Update 31 July

World Food Festival Organisers Highlight Secrecy of Council Over Park  Events

In response to Friends of Norbury Park Jenni  Rogers’ concerns about the World Food Festival being held in the  Park in a few weeks time, the organisers have exposed the secrecy of the Council in negotiating proposals for events. They state:

‘We are happy to liaise with local organisations to make sure the local community are as happy as possible. 

In regards to the dedicated phone line, we will post letters in the letter boxes of homes on all surrounding roads of the park. This letter will give the residents information about the festival and a phone number to call during the event hours if they have an issue with noise, rubbish or anything else directly linked to the event. If we receive a call, a member of management will be dispatched to that address to assess the issue. For example, to take sound level readings if it is a noise issue. They will try to resolve the issue raised and they will then record the complaint and provide the council with this information post event. 

In terms of the event being a disruption to regular park users, we do not see this being the case as we are only using a section of the park. We will not be blocking any park entrances or any paths within the park. Park users will still be able to access all facilities such as the children’s playground or BMX track. There will also still be plenty of space for general park use, walking dogs etc.

Regarding prior consultation, this is something that I would suggest speaking to the council about and requesting that they make it a condition for all future applications to use the park, that you are a part of the process. I hope you can appreciate that we as an events company were not aware that you exist, we were simply offered an event space by the council and followed the process which includes meetings with various departments, event notices around the park and notices in the local paper to advise the local community of the event during the application process.


Of course, with that being said now that we are aware of the group, moving forward we are happy to liaise with you during the planning stages of any future events and take on board any feedback that you might have in the hope of always improving the event for the local community.’

Book Donations To Norbury Library

After over two years of trying to get clarification on its policy on residents donating books to the Library Service, the Council has now agreed to accept the donation of one set for each Library of the late Norbury resident Eric Sanders’ autobiography and two novels. They have also agreed to accept the following donations from me  for Norbury Library.

Anderson, M. D. History and Imagery in British Churches. John Murray. 1971

Appleby et al. London Walks. 25 Walks by London writers. Vol. 2. Time Out. 2005

Beckett, Francis, Hencke, David & Kochan, Nick. Blair Inc. The Man Behind The Mask. John Blake. 2015. Hbk

Bloom, Jonathan & Blair, Sheila.Islam.Empireof Faith. BBC. 2001. Hbk

Boushey, Heather, Delong, J.Bradford & Steinbaum, Marshall. After Piketty. The Agenda for Economics and Inequality. Harvard University  Press. 2017. Hbk

Bower, Tom. The Red Web. MI6 and the KGB Master Coup. Aurum Press.1989. Hbk

Foreman, Amanda. Georgian’s World. The Illustrated Georgina, Duchess of Devonshire. Harper Collins. 2001. Hbk

Glendinning, Victoria. Jonathan Swift. Hutchinson. 1998

Grindrod, John. Concretopia. A Journey Around the Rebuilding of Postwar Britain. Old Street Publishing. 2011. Croydon author. Includes details about Croydon.

Hawker, Maximilian. Breaking  the Foals. A novel about Troy by a Croydon author. Unbound. 2018

Hernon, Ian. The Wild East. Gunfights, Massacres and Race Riots Far From America’s Frontier. Amberley. 2019. Hbk

Lansley, Stewart. Three Decades of the Super-rich and the Economy. Gibson Square. 2011. Hbk

Lansley, Stewart & Mack, Joanna. Breadline Britain. The Rise of Mass Poverty. One World Publications. 2015

Laybourn,Keith (ed.). Social Conditions, Status and Community 1860-c.1920. Sutton Publishing. 1997

Milliband, Ed. Go Big. How To Fix The World. The Bodley Head. 2021. Hbk

Omissi, David. The Sepoy and the Raj. The Indian Army, 1860-1940. Macmillan Press.1994

Rae, Pamela. Turtle at Mr Humble’s. The fortunes of a mercantile family in England and American 1758-1837. Smith Settle.1992.

Satia, Priya. Empire of Guns. The Violent Making of the Industrial Revolution. Duckworth Overlook. 2018. Hbk

Simpson, Kenneth (ed.). Love & Liberty. Robert Burns. A Bicentenary Celebration. Tuckwell Press. 1997

Taylor, Stephen. Storm & Conquest. The Battle for the Indian Ocean, 1809. Faber & Faber. 2007

Wardroper, John. The World of William Hone. A new look at the Romantic age in words and pictures of the day. Shelfmark Books. 1997

Winstone, Ruth (ed.) Tony Benn. The Last Diaries. A Blaze of Autumn Sunshine. Hutchinson. 2017. Hbk

Zacks. The Pirate Hunter. The True Story of Captain Kidd. Theia. 2002. Hbk

It may take a little time before these are borrowable.

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Building A Stronger Community in Norbury 

A Discussion Note

The purpose of this note is to raise issues and questions for discussion about the way forward for community activity given the challenges facing residents and community organisations in the area.

The Challenges In Norbury

Among the challenges in Norbury are:

  • The decline in the number of active members of its community organisations.
  • The neglect by the Council of positive action to support the local communities and their organisations.
  • The failure of the Council to develop the use of the refurbished library and its community hall.
  • The decision of the Council not to offer the management lease on Harlow Hall to the partnership of Love Norbury members led by the Norbury Community Land Trust?
  • The refusal of Network Rail modernise the Railway Station and change the fare structure down to East and West Croydon resulting in commuters parking in Norbury’s resident streets.
  • The growth in the private rented sector meaning that a growing number of residents do not live in the area sufficiently long to build roots and become involved.
  • The licensing and planning rules which allow shops to open that are not wanted by residents.
  • The loss of employment and community buildings in favour of flats.
  • Growing social and economic inequalities.

What Does ‘Community’  Mean?

The word ‘community’ has been overused by Government, local authorities,  interest groups and the media without an explanation of what it means. There needs to be a common understanding about the meaning other wise people will be talking at cross purposes.

What is ‘community’?

‘Community’ can be defined as the web of personal relationships, groups, networks, traditions and patterns of behaviour:

  • that exist amongst those who share physical neighbourhoods socio-economic conditions or common understandings and interests;
  • that develop against the backdrop of the physical neighbourhood and its socio-economic situation.

The word ‘community’ is often treated as a single entity. It is not – it is comprised of many different overlapping communities, including:

  • geographic – people living in a  neighbourhood or on an estate
  • of interest sharing concerns and perspectives e.g. users, disabled, ethnic, faith, gender/sexuality, age based, interest, workplace, business, sport, hobby

People move in and out of different communities, and can belong to more than one community at any one time. However:

  • some communities are more privileged than others
  • many communities can be excluded.

What Is ‘The Community’ in Norbury?

  • What are the many varied ‘communities’ in Norbury?
  • Which are more privileged than others?
  • Which are excluded or perceive themselves to be excluded?

The answers to these questions should form part of an analysis which underpins what the needs and aspirations of residents as individuals and collectively in their different ‘communities’ that should be addressed in the development of a strategy for the future by local organisations.

What Makes for a Good Community?

In the past the following have been defined as key characteristics for a good and well functioning ‘community’.

  • A learning community, where people and groups gain knowledge, skills and confidence through community action.
  • A fair and just community, which upholds civic rights and equality of opportunity, and which recognizes and celebrates the distinctive features of its cultures.
  • An active and empowered community, where people are fully involved and which has strong and varied local organisations and a clear identity and self-confidence.
  • An influential community, which is consulted and has a strong voice in decisions which affect its interests.
  • An economically strong community, which creates opportunities for work and which retains a high proportion of its wealth.
  • A caring community, aware of the needs of its members and in which services are of good quality and meet these needs.
  • A green community, with a healthy and pleasant environment, awareness of environmental responsibility.
  • A safe community, where people do not fear crime, violence or other hazards.
  • A welcoming community, which people like, feel happy about and do not wish to leave.
  • A lasting community, which is well established and likely to survive.

Does Norbury meet these concepts?

Community Development

‘Community development’ is a process which its advocates claim:

  • builds a stronger civil society and develops ways to ensure the local people are able to influence the decisions that affect their lives;
  • enriches the web of relationships and make its threads stronger,
  • develops self-confidence and skills,

so that the community (the people) can begin to make significant improvements to their neighbourhood (the place) and its material environment.

 Community development starts from the assumption that most social problems are rooted in the political, social and economic structure. It is the process of building active and sustainable communities based on social justice and mutual respect. It is about changing power structures to remove the barriers that prevent people from participating in the issues that affect their lives. It expresses values of fairness, equality, accountability, opportunity, choice, participation, mutuality, reciprocity and continuous learning. Educating, enabling and empowering are at the core of community development.

Community Development in Norbury

How are Norbury’s local community organisations contributing to local ‘community development’.  

  • Do they have a strategy to ensure that they have close links with the different communities at neighbourhood and special interest level.
  • How do they currently work with the area’s diverse  communities to find out their needs, aspirations and ideas?
  • What policies and strategies do they already have to support community development?
  • How are these policies shared and developed into an overall strategy to support community development?
  • How is the general public in Norbury informed about individual organisations?

What do we know about the extent of community development in Norbury?

  • Where is it strong and where is it weak?
  • How is information from the community organisations made available to the different local communities?
  • Is it clear, jargon-free and available in relevant places, formats and languages?
  • Are there resources such as buildings, information communication technology, printing, and equipment that are accessible to Norbury’s communities?
  • What community development learning opportunities are available to Norbury

community activists and volunteers?

  • How can organisations work together to support the development of accessible learning opportunities?
  • What opportunities are there for Norbury organisations to learn together and with communities about partnership working? How can these opportunities be developed?

Valuing Difference and Diversity

The concept suggested above of ‘community’ recognises that there are a range of diverse  needs of different social, cultural, and ethnic groups. A key issue for debate is how this diversity can be respected and catered for, while at the same time connections can be made between diverse groups in order to avoid the creation of separateness. This lies at the centre of what is called ‘community cohesion’. The concept of respect between different groups is also linked to ‘community cohesion’.

The Concept Of Respect

The concept of ‘respect’ includes:

  • valuing differences – different cultures, backgrounds, skills, faiths, abilities and disabilities;
  • acknowledging and recognising people’s life experiences and the choices they make;
  • sharing common bonds and working together on issues that concern us all.

‘Respect’ can be shown towards each other by:

  • treating other people as we wish to be treated
  • leading by example
  • being open and welcoming
  • embracing other cultures
  • giving thanks and positive feedback when these are due.

Relevance to Life in Norbury

  • To what extent is ‘respect’ about individuals’ relationships with each other a guiding principle among Norbury’s community organisations?
  • How can individuals develop respect if they do not meet with people in other social, cultural and ethnic groups?
  • What more needs to be done in order to help create a more ‘cohesive and respectful’ Norbury?
  • Do Norbury’s young people feel included and respected or excluded and disrespected addressed?
  • Do they have opportunities for their voices to be heard?
  • Do isolated older people and people with disabilities  feel valued
  • Are there  safe, easily accessible places to socialise, communicate and support each other?
  • Do they have opportunities for their voices to be heard?
  • Are Norbury’s  unemployed residents regarded asworthless, workshy and on the scrap heap or as people whose potential is suppressed?
  • Are there local opportunities for voluntary work for unemployed residents?

What do you think?

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Given The Number Of Conditions Should 66 Pollards Hill North Have Been Approved?

In  approving the planning application to demolish 66 Pollards Hill North and allow the building of 9 two storey houses with rooms in roof space facing onto Pollards Hill North and Beech Road, with associated landscaping, refuse and recycling storage and cycle and car parking, the Planners have placed 22conditions on the scheme. 

This is yet another example of not requiring applicants to submit more detail before the decision was taken, creating more work for the Planners and difficulties for objectors to follow and comment on the applications on how the conditions will be met. The Government’s National Planning Policy Framework advises against too many conditions.

The first two conditions are standard ones including requiring adherence to the drawings. The other 20 conditions are as follows.

Construction Logistics Plan

‘3 Prior to the commencement of development, including demolition, a (CLP) shall be submitted to and approved in writing by the Local Planning Authority. The CLP shall include the following information for all construction phases of the development: a) Hours of construction; b) Hours of deliveries; c) Parking of vehicles associated with deliveries, site personnel, operatives and visitors taking into account the bus route and entrance to the allotment d) Facilities for the loading and unloading of plant and materials; taking into account the bus route and entrance to the allotment e) Details of any site hoardings; f) Details of the precautions to guard against the deposit of mud and substances on the public highway; g) Dust control methods. h) Condition of the highway survey All construction phases of the development shall be carried out strictly in accordance with the details so approved. Reason: To safeguard the amenity of surrounding residents and the area generally, and to prevent adverse impacts upon the transport network during the construction phase of the development. This condition is required to be pre-commencement to ensure that all phases of construction do not adversely impact the amenity of surrounding residents and the area generally, and do not adversely impact upon the transport network.’

Tree protection plan

‘4 Prior to demolition and construction works, unless otherwise agreed in writing by the Local Planning Authority the development shall be carried out in accordance with the submitted and approved tree protection plan. Reason: To ensure that trees which contribute to visual amenity can be retained and are not damaged by the construction and associated works.’

Construction Environmental Management Plan

‘5 Prior to the commencement of development including demolition, a (CEMP: Biodiversity) shall be submitted to and approved in writing by the local planning authority. The CEMP (Biodiversity) shall include the following. a) Risk assessment of potentially damaging construction activities. b) Identification of “biodiversity protection zones”. c) Practical measures (both physical measures and sensitive working practices) to avoid or reduce impacts during construction (may be provided as a set of method statements to include: pollution prevention measures for nearby designated sites, predemolition inspection for bats, precautionary measures for reptiles, stag beetle, badger and hedgehog, sensitive lighting during demolition and construction period and nesting bird checks, alongside any other measures that may arise). d) The location and timing of sensitive works to avoid harm to biodiversity features. e) The times during construction when specialist ecologists need to be present on site to oversee works. f) Responsible persons and lines of communication. g) The role and responsibilities on site of an ecological clerk of works (ECoW) or similarly competent person. h) Use of protective fences, exclusion barriers and warning signs. i) Containment, control and removal of any Invasive non-native species present on site, replacement planting with native species should be detailed. The approved CEMP shall be adhered to and implemented throughout the construction period strictly in accordance with the approved details, unless otherwise agreed in writing by the local planning authority Reason: To conserve protected and Priority species and allow the LPA to discharge its duties under the Conservation of Habitats and Species Regulations 2017 (as amended), the Wildlife & Countryside Act 1981 (as amended) and s40 of the NERC Act 2006 (Priority habitats & species) as updated by the Environment Act 2021.

Materials, Elevations, Gutters etc

‘6 Prior to the commencement of above ground works, full details of the following shall be submitted to and approved in writing by the Local Planning Authority: a) External facing materials including samples of all facing materials and finishes; b) Detailed elevations indicating material specification including visible plumbing, gutters, drainage and ductwork details and lintels. The development shall be carried out strictly in accordance with the details thus approved. Reason: To ensure that the appearance of the development is acceptable and contributes towards a high quality built environment.’

Junctions & Windows

‘7 Prior to the commencement of above ground works, full details of the following shall be submitted to and approved in writing by the Local Planning Authority: a) 1:20 details of key material junctions and window fenestration, including window reveals which should aim to be a minimum depth of 225mm. The development shall be carried out strictly in accordance with the details thus approved. Reason: To ensure that the appearance of the development is acceptable and contributes towards a high quality built environment.’

Flooring Levels, Landscaping, Boundaries, Maintenance/Management, Biodiversity Enhancements

‘8 Prior to the commencement of above ground works, full details of the following shall be submitted to and approved in writing by the Local Planning Authority: a) Finished floor levels, gradients and hard landscaping materials (including samples as appropriate) b) Soft landscaping details, including existing planting to be retained, the species, size and density of proposed new planting, as well as the dimensions of new trees; c) Boundary treatments and screening; including proposed boundary treatment between private gardens and amenity spaces and submitted in 1:20 sections/elevation drawings d) A maintenance/management plan for all aspects of the hard and soft landscaping e) Green roof details to refuse storage structure and flat roof areas of the houses e) biodiversity enhancements The details approved shall be provided and completed in accordance with this condition prior to the first occupation of the development, and maintained for the lifetime of the development with the exception of new planting which shall be provided and completed in accordance with this condition prior to the end of the first planting season following completion of the development, and maintained for a period of five years from the date of planting. Any new planting which dies, is severely damaged, becomes seriously diseased or is removed within that period shall be replaced by planting of a similar size and species to that originally planted. Reason: To ensure that the appearance of the development is acceptable, contributes towards a high quality built environment, and provides a sufficient quantum and quality of child play and communal amenity space.’

Land and Floor Levels

‘9 Prior to the commencement of above ground works, full details of the following shall be submitted to and approved in writing by the Local Planning Authority: a) Detailed section drawings confirming changes in land levels and finished floor levels (including detailed structural design of floor and roof build-ups). The development shall be carried out strictly in accordance with the details thus approved. Reason: To ensure that the appearance of the development is acceptable and contributes towards a high quality built environment.’

Surface Water Drainage Scheme

10 Prior to the commencement of above ground works, a detailed surface water drainage scheme incorporating the following measures shall be submitted to and approved in writing by the Local Planning Authority: a) Calculation of the existing and proposed run-off rate (which should achieve greenfield run-off rates unless an alternative rate is adequately justified and achieved); b) Confirmation of the impermeable and permeable site areas used for the infiltration calculations; c) Details of the on-site infiltration drainage; d) Details of the on-site attenuation tank; e) Details of further sustainable drainage measures; f) An updated layout plan (to scale) of the proposed drainage scheme; g) Details of the ownership and /or maintenance agreement for the SUDS on the site. The approved scheme shall be implemented prior to the first occupation of the development and maintained thereafter. Reason: To ensure surface water runoff is managed safely and effectively to manage flood risk to/from the development.’

Biodiversity Enhancement Strategy

‘11 Prior to the commencement of above ground works, a Biodiversity Enhancement Strategy, providing the finalised details and locations of the enhancement measures as recommended above. As a minimum this shall include: Landscape plans should include high numbers of native species and not specify non-native/ornamental varieties. Biodiverse roofs wherever possible (i.e. bin stores, cycle stores, outbuildings) to include native species or those of wildlife value, installation of external and integrated bird and bat boxes including sparrow terraces, hedgehog connectivity measures in fences, floral turfs rather than amenity grassland to boost wildlife gain, provision of bug boxes and hedgehog homes as well as a sensitive lighting scheme. The Defra Biodiversity Metrics or London’s Urban Greening Factor can be utilised and submitted to support this finalised document. This document shall be submitted to and approved in writing by the local planning authority. The content of the Biodiversity Enhancement Strategy shall include the following: a) Purpose and conservation objectives for the proposed enhancement measures; b) detailed designs to achieve stated objectives; c) locations of proposed enhancement measures by appropriate maps and plans; d) persons responsible for implementing the enhancement measures; e) details of initial aftercare and long-term maintenance (where relevant). The works shall be implemented in accordance with the approved details prior to occupation and shall be retained in that manner thereafter. Reason: To enhance Protected and Priority Species/habitats and allow the LPA to discharge its duties under the s40 of the NERC Act 2006 (Priority habitats & species) as updated by the Environment Act 2021.’

Structural Stability and Foundations, Retaining Walls

‘12 Prior to the commencement of above ground works, full details of the following , shall be submitted to and approved in writing by the Local Planning Authority: a) Full details of structural stability and foundations b) Retaining walls The development shall be carried out strictly in accordance with the details thus approved and shall be retained in that manner thereafter. Reason: To ensure that the appearance of the development is acceptable and contributes towards a high quality built environment.’

Security & Parking Requirements

‘13 Prior to the occupation of development details of the following must be submitted to and approved in writing by the Local Planning Authority: a) security lighting b) visibility splays, parking layout/egreeses to each parking spaces c) full details of electric charging points for car parking d) cycle storage appearance The development shall be carried out strictly in accordance with the details thus approved and shall be retained in that manner thereafter. Reason: To ensure that the appearance of the development is acceptable and contributes towards a high quality built environment. 14 Prior to the occupation of development details of the following must be submitted to and approved in writing by the Local Planning Authority: a) refuse storage structures The development shall be carried out strictly in accordance with the details thus approved and shall be retained in that manner thereafter. Reason: To ensure that the appearance of the development is acceptable and contributes towards a high quality built environment.’

Carbon Emissions

‘15 The development hereby permitted shall achieve a minimum 19% improvement in the Dwelling Emission Rate (DER) over the Target Emission Rate (TER) as defined in Part L1A of the Building Regulations (2013). Reason: To ensure high standards of sustainable design and construction in new development.’

Ecological Mitigation

‘16 All mitigation measures and/or works shall be carried out in accordance with the details contained in the submitted ecological reports and shall be retained in that manner thereafter. Reason: To conserve and enhance Protected and Priority species and allow the LPA to discharge its duties under the Conservation of Habitats and Species Regulations 2017, the Wildlife & Countryside Act 1981 and s40 of the NERC Act 2006 (Priority habitats & species) as updated by the Environment Act 2021.’

Water Efficiency

‘17 The development hereby permitted shall achieve a minimum water efficiency standard of 105/litres/person/day. Reason: To ensure high standards of sustainable design and construction in new development’

Windows

‘18 No additional windows shall be formed in the western flank elevations of the proposed building of House 1 and the approved windows to be installed in the flank elevations of the building at first floor level and above shall be glazed with obscure glass of an obscurity level of no less than 3 and non-opening below 1.7m in height and shall thereafter be permanently retained as such. Reason: To safeguard the amenity of adjacent residents and the area generally.’

Roof Areas

‘19 The roof area(s) of the structures hereby permitted and approved shall not be used as a balcony, roof garden or similar area and notwithstanding the provisions of the Town and Country Planning (General Permitted Development) Order 2015 (as amended) no alterations shall be carried out to create access to it. Reason: To safeguard the amenity of adjacent residents and the area generally.’

Permitted Devlopment Rights

‘20 Notwithstanding the provisions of the Town and Country Planning (General Permitted Development) Order 2015 (as amended) no development relating to Class A, B, C, D and E of Part 1 of Schedule 2 (Householder Permitted Development Rights) shall be undertaken without the prior written approval of the Local Planning Authority. Reason: To safeguard the amenity of adjacent residents and the area generally.’

Building Regulations Compliance

‘21 All of the residential units within the development hereby approved shall be constructed and fitted out to comply with the Building Regulations 2010 (as amended) optional requirement M4(2) ‘accessible and adaptable’, save for at least 1 of the homes which shall comply with either the optional requirement M4(3)(2)(a) ‘wheelchair adaptable’, or the optional requirement M4(3)(2)(b) ‘wheelchair accessible’. Such provision shall be reasonably maintained for the lifetime of the development. Reason: To ensure the adequate provision of accessible and adaptable dwellings and wheelchair adaptable and wheelchair accessible dwellings.

Fire Safety Strategy

‘22 The development must be carried out in accordance with the provision of the submitted Fire Safety Strategy unless otherwise approved in writing by the Local Planning Authority. Reason: To ensure that the development incorporates the necessary fire safety measures.’

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World Food Fair Organisers Patronise Norbury

In response to an enquiry about the World Food Festival on 3 and 4 September in Norbury Park, the Park Friends Chair Jenni Rodgers  has received the following from Damien, the event manager  

Hello Jenni,

I hope all is well.

Thank you for reaching out and addressing the concerns you have regarding our upcoming event at Norbury Park. 

We would love for the friends of Norbury Park to come down, attend the event, take some photos for your social media pages and enjoy the festival with us.

The World Food Festival is a family orientated event for the local community, for this reason it is very important to us that we keep all the local residents informed and included. 

We will do this by posting letters to all of the residents on the surrounding roads of the park which will give event information, a dedicated resident phone line for any issues during the event and also include free tickets to attend.

The event will not have dedicated parking, all ticket holders will be informed by way of email and social media communication that the site has no parking and we advise everybody to take public transport. 

Regarding litter, we have a full waste management plan that includes litter pickers, people doing sweeps of surrounding roads and also sweeps of the park outside of the event perimeter. 

We can assure you that the festival is not a loud, disruptive event. It is more like a local community fair than a music festival which usually brings out a completely different clientele and requires music to be very loud.  

This event will be positive for the local area, something that people of all races, religions and ages can attend. In our experience events like this tend to bring the local community together.

I hope this has provided some clarity but if you have any further questions please do not hesitate to ask. 

Many Thanks’

Patronising Tokenism

This is a very patronising reply. If they were genuine about their views on ‘local community’ why did they:

  • not contact  the Friends before they submitted their licence application?
  • not offer the Friends a free stall and gazebo to enable the Love Norbury organisations to promote themselves?
  • not offer discounts to local residents?

What they have effectively done is to dump their Festival on the Park.

Jenni is considering how to reply.

For the extensive police conditions on the event see:

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Norbury Update 24 July

This week has two  important events  in Norbury

  • The Cassandra lunch club Windrush Generation theme on Thursday.
  • The Cassandra table top sale on Sunday 31 July

See previous postings.

Then on Sunday 8 August there is the fundraising Festival for the Jamaican Schools charity.

A much bigger event is being held on 7 and 8 September –the World Food Festival- see next posting about the patronising tokenism of the organisers.

There have been three more planning refusals.

Planning Applications

92 Ingram Road. Conversion of single dwelling into 3 self contained flats and single side extension.

143 Pollards Hill South. GPDO single storey rear extension

Planning Approvals

23 Bigginwood Road. GPDO  single storey rear extension

53 Briar Avenue. Retrospective erection rear dormer. 

100 – 102 Green Lane. Demolition of two existing dwellings for three new 3-storey 4 bedroom and three new 2-storey 3 bedroom dwelling houses with associated vehicle accesses from Green Lane and Virginia Road

66 Pollards Hill North. Demolition of existing  dwelling house  and erection of 9 two storey houses with rooms in roof space facing onto Pollards Hill North and Beech Road. See posting after the next one on the World Food Fair for the extensive conditions.

55 Springfield Road. Part retrospective two storey side and rear extension.

42 Virginia Road. LDC roof extension, rear dormer and provision of two roof lights 

Planning Refusal. 10 Ena Road

GPDO single storey rear extension. Reasons:

‘1 The development would be detrimental to the amenities of the occupiers of the adjoining property at 12 Ena Road by reason of its scale, siting, height and depth which would result in visual intrusion and loss of outlook….

2 The plans submitted for prior approval are inaccurate and ambiguous and do not allow for the Council as the local authority to make a favourable determination of the application’.

Planning Refusal. 144 Stanford Road

Erection of single storey rear extension. Reason:

‘The proposed extension by way of its excessive depth and position beyond the rear of the neighbouring property would result in harm to living conditions through loss of light and outlook.’

Planning Refusal. 31 The Chase

Retention of rear conservatory following alterations to the existing roof. Reasons:

‘1 By reason of its scale, bulk and massing, the single storey extension dominates and detracts from the appearance of the existing building ….

2 The extension is detrimental to the existing residential amenity of the occupiers of No. 29 The Chase by reason of its scale and mass. The extension results in an unacceptable loss of outlook and on the neighbouring habitable room windows creating an oppressive environment’.

Discussion on Norbury’s Community

See later posting.

History News Update

https://seancreighton1947.wordpress.com

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Norbury Watch Update 21 July

Cassandra Centre Summer Activities

Cassandra Centre is planning a busy summer period with activities for children and young people and the continuation of the Lunch Club at Harlow Hall on Thursdays (noon-3pm), with a special theme of celebrating the Windrush Generation on 28 July, and a table top sale in the Lloyds Bank Car Park on Sunday 31 July.

Future Of Harlow Hall Management

Attendees at the Club are angry at the decision on the future management of Harlow Hall and are considering how to campaign to get the decision changed.

NVRA Activities

The Norbury Village Residents Association’s Committee has reviewed its activities over the next few months. As well as taking up issues in its areas with the Councillors, it has recommended to the Love Norbury Committee meeting on 20 July action on  the future of the Library and the Railway Station.

Commemorating David Clark

The NVRA Committee also discussed a memorial to our local historian David Clark. e.g. a bench or  a plaque on the bench outside the Library. John Brown the Streatham historian who knew David has suggested that Love Norbury consider a memorial e.g. a mural under the Railway Bridge. Love Norbury has previously lobbied for a mural but the idea was rejected by Network Rail. Love Norbury has agreed to lobby the Mayor about the state of the Railway Station. It has also agreed to support the idea of a plaque on the bench at the Library and the hanging of the posters in the Library.

Friends of the Parks News

Friends of Norbury Park had a meeting with the organiser of the Jamaican Schools fundraisng event about organisational control of the event and noise. They are requesting the Council provides a contact to report excessive noise at events in the Park. TheFriends are meeting Xavier Mendez from the Park Maintenance team on Tuesday next week at 11.30am in the Park to discuss the grass cutting regime in the different parts of the Park.

Discussions are underway as to whether weekly Tai chi and Qigong community classes woud be better held in Norbury or Norbury Hall Park.

Love Norbury Plans

The Love Norbury Committee  is  considering the idea of supporting a Literary Festival with the Library Service at Norbury Library, given the cancellation of both attempted events to celebrate the re-opening of the refurbished Library. The Committee is inviting the Executive Mayor Jason Perry to speak at its AGM on 21 September. It is finalising with the Council of the dates of when the Xmas lights on the London Rd lamp posts which it funds will switched on. It will working on the plans this year’s Xmas Fayre at Norbury Methodist Church Hall. It aims to distribute a newsletter to every household in early September.

The Future Of The Norbury Community Land Trust

Given the failure to win the management of Harlow Hall the Norbury Community Land Trust Board (which I Chair) is considering its future options, including winding up or continuing to try and take advantage of new opportunities that arise. I am using the next few weeks to further flesh out the Trust’s proposed Norbury History project.

Norbury’s Paloma Lacy Interviews Mayor Jason Perry

In her capacity as a freelance journalist Love Norbury Committee member Paloma Lacy has interviewed Mayor Jason Perry.

NVRA Survey On Medical Consultations

Because of concerns about the increase in the number of telephone consultations with GPs and hospital staff necessitated by the COVID pandemic, and the danger of that it will become the norm instead of face to face consultations, NVRA is running a survey to find out residents views. You can download the survey here:

When you have completed it you can email it back to me at sean.creighton1947@btinternet.com.

Planning Applications

50 Bishops Park Road. Demolition of existing building and erection of a three-storey building providing 9 residential units for social housing purposes with associated landscaping and access.

94 Christian Fields. LDC for loft conversion, Rear dormer, front facing dormer windows.  

Land To R/O 109-111 Dalmeny Avenue. Erection of a single-storey detached dwelling house associated demolition of existing structures.

70 Melrose Avenue. GPDO single storey rear extension.

Litter Free Norbury Gets Increase in Litter Bins

Litter Free Norbury reports on Facebook the progress with its campaign to have more street litter bins.

‘In early 2021, the whole of the high street and surrounding area was only served by 6 of the Big Belly type bins, with every single one of the traditional “plastic” type bins having mysteriously “disappeared” in previous years.

Since then we have had a number of bins reinstated along the high street area, with a total of 19 bins being in place, including 2 at the Green Lane shopping District and 2 at the Southern shopping district on London Road (near the Tesco garage).

We are continuing to request additional bins, as it is apparent that there is still over 160m between bin locations on the West side of London Road and the infrastructure can still be improved.

We have also attempted to get answers about why the bins were removed/not replaced. The council insists that it does not remove bins, and has also stated that Veolia does not either.

The intimation, of course, being to put the blame onto members of the public.

When questioned about the scale of this apparent theft, it has also stated that it has no evidence of any thefts. It has declined to comment as to why it did not replace any of them. Interesting given that over 30 bins have “disappeared” from Green Lane and Norbury Crescent and areas in between.

It’s also interesting to note that since we have been investigating this issue and raised it many times with the council, not a single bin has disappeared since.

We are continuing the conversation currently with Steve Reed MP and Executive Mayor, Jason Perry.

Below is an updated map of current/previous known bin locations:

Croydon and History Updates

https://seancreighton1947.wordpress.com

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Cassandra Centre Table-top Sale 31 July

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Cassandra Lunch Club Celebrates Windrush Generation 28 July

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